Concert Info

Lineup

Roger Daltrey: Vocals, Harmonica
John Entwistle: Bass, Vocals
Keith Moon: Drums, Vocals
Pete Townshend : Vocals, Guitar

Attendance and Support


Support Act: Quicksilver Messinger Service

Note

Marc Bergeron: "After careful research, we have reached the conclusion that the venue for August 17th 1968 is Phoenix Municipal Stadium, Phoenix, Arizona USA."
The Who

Sat, 17 August 1968:

Phoenix, AZ, Municipal Stadium

Setlist

No known setlist

Fanreport

Rick Rieckhoff

The Who - they were my first major concert experience. They played in a football stadium and were touring to support "Magic Bus". All of the people, the pot in the air, what an atmosphere. This was the Who’s first major U.S. tour and the last one before "Tommy" was released. They were considered one of the best live bands in the world and their reputation preceded them.

They played with a fierce abandon and smashed their instruments at the end of the show. I was up against the stage the whole time and had a fantastic view of one of the premier rock bands of the 60’s with all original members. This vantage point did little to help my hearing and as the years went by I always expected but seldom got such great positioning for a show. They played hit after hit since they had a staple of at least 10 top twenty single.

Roger Daltrey wore his trademark fringed jacket during this tour and Keith Moon was at his finest. This was before he became the bloated former shell of himself. He was still fit and vibrant on the drums, each one with the coda "world’s greatest drummer” written on it, beside the side shot of a naked, young enthusiast. Roger had a routine down pat where he twirled the microphone through the air in a lasso style, multiple times and then tossed it into the air and always caught it right at the moment where he needed it to complete the verse.

I have a piece of an amplifier and a 3 inch long piece of Pete Townshend’s red Gibson SG guitar as a souvenir from that show. It ended with "My Generation" and a typical Who type tearing apart of the stage and all equipment within reach. It was a dramatic spectacle, one that has been often imitated but rarely surpassed. They were a fantastic live band, one of the true modern rock pioneers.